Commercial Storm Water

At commercial sites, chemical spills that contain toxic substances and uncovered or unprotected outdoor storage or waste areas can contribute pollutants to storm water runoff. Trash and litter from parking lots and dumpster areas also have the potential to be washed into the storm drain system. Best management practices include:

  • Wash vehicles or equipment in wash bays hooked up to the sanitary sewer. Don’t wash off detergents, oils, and greases into streets, parking lots, or storm drains.
  • Divert rainfall runoff from fueling islands by building a canopy or cover over them.
  • In compliance with Fire Code, any barrels containing potentially hazardous liquids should be in a sealed container, stored inside a building or under cover, and propped up on pallets with secondary containment in case of a spill.
  • Waste and processed water of any type must be discharged to the sanitary sewer. Discharge of waste water to the ground or storm drains is prohibited.
  • Be sure to know spill cleanup procedures. Have cleanup materials nearby with a spill prevention plan known by all employees.
  • Waste storage for used oils, solvents and other hazardous fluids must be under cover with secondary containment in case of a spill and to prevent rainfall from contact which would wash hazardous fluids into nearby storm drains.
  • Pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers used for lawn care. Following manufacturer’s recommendations maximizes the effectiveness of these potential pollutants while simultaneously minimizing the amount of product required. Sweep or blow remaining products off the street and sidewalks back onto the lawn. Keep products in a sealed container in a covered storage facility.
  • Salt or other deicing materials. Following manufacturer’s recommendations maximizes the effectiveness of these products while simultaneously minimizing the amount of product required. Keep products in a sealed container in a covered storage facility to prevent these products from being in contact with rain and snow.
  • Proper management of parking lot surfaces can limit the amount of garbage and other pollutants that are washed to the storm drain system. Best management practices include: Regular sweeping of impervious surfaces such as sidewalks, driveways, and parking lots. Regular inspections of dumpster and dumpster enclosures to clean up loose trash and replacement of leaking or damaged trash receptacles.
  • Construct on-site infiltration structures that divert storm water runoff from the storm drain system. These structures have the ability to slow the flow of runoff, spread the runoff out, and allow the runoff to soak into the ground after it travels through one or more filtration techniques rather than being immediately discharged to Drapery City’s storm drain system. These are also know as “Low Impact Development” structures (LID).