Construction Storm Water

Waste from chemicals and materials used in construction can wash into storm drains during rainy weather. Soil that erodes from construction sites can contribute to environmental degradation. Listed below are other harmful contributors from the construction site.

  • A Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) is required on all construction projects. These plans are meant to assist Draper City, owners, developers, and contractors with implementing good housekeeping techniques and best management practices. They are also created and implemented to ensure compliance with federal, state, and local code.
  • Vehicle and equipment maintenance becomes a significant factor when engine repairs or preventive maintenance such as changing oil and other fluids occurs at the construction site.Maintain a “dry site” by using off-site facilities, performing work in designated areas only, providing cover for materials stored outside, containing and cleaning up spills immediately, and training employees and subcontractors.
  • Waste from chemicals and materials used in construction can wash into storm drains during rainy weather.Soil that erodes from construction sites can contribute to environmental degradation.• Wash waters from concrete mixers should be disposed of back at the contractor’s site or a large lined pit, big enough to contain all the wash waters.Never rinse out concrete truck chutes with a hose and allow the water to run down the street gutter into the storm drains.
  • Waste storage for used oils, solvents and other hazardous fluids must be under cover with secondary containment in case of a spill and to prevent rainfall from contact which would wash hazardous fluids into nearby storm drains.
  • Landscaping and earthmoving pollutants include planting, excavation, tilling, masonry and concrete; solid wastes such as trees and shrubs, soil additives and re-vegetation of graded areas, all contribute to soil erosion.Use silt fences to hold back loose soil. Applying water to disturbed and sandy areas minimizes dust when it gets windy and allows sand and soils to stay out of street gutters where rainwater can wash it into storm drains.
  • Construct on-site infiltration structures that divert storm water runoff from the storm drain system. These structures have the ability to slow the flow of runoff, spread the runoff out, and allow the runoff to soak into the ground after it travels through one or more filtration techniques rather than being immediately discharged to Drapery City’s storm drain system. These are also know as “Low Impact Development” structures (LID).